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Salem

dr philip salem

 

Dr. Philip Salem

Professor Emeritus

Ph.D. University of Denver, Speech Communication
M.A. University of Denver, Speech Communication

B.S. Northern State University, Speech and Drama

Organizational Communication, Communication & Technology, Conflict Management, Negotiation and Mediation, Interpersonal Communication

Office: Centennial Hall 329
Phone: 512.245.2165
Email: ps05@txstate.edu

About Dr. Salem

Dr. Salem has taught nearly 30 different classes since coming to Texas State. He was instrumental in developing classes in organizational communication and in interpersonal communication, and he taught one of the first classes in the nation about communication and technology. He directed over 500 student organizational communication assessment projects, served as the Department’s graduate advisor for over 20 years, and was the first person on the faculty nominated for the Presidential Award for Teaching. He was honored at a recent College of Fine Arts and Communication convocation for his lifetime of teaching.

The International Communication Association and the National Communication Association have honored his contributions to organizational communication. He has been a frequent speaker on special research panels about communication and technology. A noble laureate recommended his work on complexity theory to a special conference, and he was privileged to explain his ideas as a keynote speaker for the Russian Communication Association and for the Society for Chaos Theory in Psychology and Life Sciences. He has delivered guest lectures at many universities around the country as well as invited scholarly presentations in Austria, Belgium, Italy, and Russia. He was awarded a Fulbright Senior Specialist fellowship.

Dr. Salem has completed Human Communication Technology, a textbook for undergraduate classes, and the 2nd edition of The Complexity of Human Communication, a book describing the process and evolving nature of communication. He edited Organizational Communication and Change, a collection of papers from scholars attending conferences he directed in 1976 and in 1996. He co-directed a 40th anniversary conference in 2016, and co-edited Transformative Practices and Research in Organizational Communication, a collection of papers from that conference. “The Seven Communication Reasons Organizations Do Not Change” is one of his most popular scholarly articles (http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=1740514).

His consultant work focuses on organizational communication development, and he routinely assists clients in assessing and planning organizational communication. Recently, he was featured prominently on the College Webpage where he explained many aspects of his teaching and research (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YjhJ-i-bdPQ).

Courses Taught

COMM 3319: Organizational Communication
COMM 3325: Communication and Conflict Management

COMM 4325: Human Communication Technology
COMM 5319: Seminar in Organizational Communication
COMM 5329B: Communication and Negotiation
COMM 5332: Communication and Technology

Representative Publications

Salem, P. J., & Timmerman, E. (Eds.). (2018). Transformative practices and research in organizational communication. Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Salem, P. J. (2018). Transformative organizational communication practices. In P. J. Salem & E. Timmerman (Eds.). Transformative practices and research in organizational communication (pp. 109-129). Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Salem, P. J. (2016). Human communication technology. Austin, TX: Sentia Publishing.

Salem, P. J. (2013). The complexity of human communication (2nd ed.). Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Salem, P. J. (2013). The complexity of organizational communication: Describing communication during organizational turbulence. Nonlinear Dynamics, Psychology, & Life Sciences, 49-65.

Salem, P. J., & Shields, P. M. (2011). Out of the woods: Facilitating pragmatic inquiry and dialogue. Administration and Society, 43(1), 124-132.

Salem, P. J. (2008). The seven communication reasons organizations do not change. Corporate Communications, 13(3), 333-348.