Skip to Content

In The News

Communication Studies Boasts Two More Presidential Award Winners

Michael Burns
Michael Burns

Michael Burns received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Service at the Assistant Professor/Lecturer rank. Michael is a Senior Lecturer and Director of Career Readiness in the Department of Communication Studies. He also serves as the Co-Director for the College of Fine Arts and Communication's research program, CoSearch and is one of the co-curators for TEDxTexasStateUniversity. Michael also works for NBC’s Today Show on the production management and logistics team covering the Olympic Games, as well as coordinating their intern program. He has worked the 2006 Torino, 2008 Beijing, 2012 London, 2016 Rio de Janeiro, and 2018 PyeongChang Olympic Games.

Kristen Farris
Kristen Farris

Kristen Farris received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching at the Assistant Professor rank. Kristen is an Assistant Professor and previously served as one of the course directors for the Fundamentals of Human communication Course (COMM 1310) for the past ten years. Under her leadership, the Basic Course was honored with the Program of Distinction Award in 2010 and the Program of Excellence Award in 2011 from the National Communication Association. Kristen’s research focuses on interpersonal communication at the intersections of health and instructional communication. Her scholarship centers on the ways in which individuals use communication to cope with chronic illnesses or life stressors and how interactants' communication influences their psychosocial outcomes. She is also interested in investigating instructor-student communication in the classroom, student adjustment to college, and assessment of student communication competency.

Ann Burnette Honored by Board of Regents

Ann Burnette
Ann Burnette

The Texas State University System Board of Regents approved a resolution honoring Ann Burnette with the Regents’ Teacher Award. This award is given to exceptional teachers for their outstanding performance as educators, contributions to the development of courses, and use of innovative teaching methods.  

 

She adds this designation to a list of prestigious accolades including Piper Professor for 2020, the Everette Swinney Faculty Senate Excellence in Teaching Award in 2019 and 2020, the Southern States Communication Association John I. Sisco Excellence in Teaching Award in 2016, and Texas State Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2015.

 

Dr. Burnette’s scholarship and teaching focus on the ways that public communication is used to define notions of citizenship, democracy, national security, and leadership. She teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in Political Communication, American Speeches, Persuasion, and the Rhetoric of Women’s Rights. She serves as a graduate thesis supervisor and committee member, and co-founded the Texas State chapter of Lambda Pi Eta National Communication Honor Society, which promotes the intellectual development and service contributions of communication students.

Faculty Accolades

Susie Bannon
Susie Bannon

Susannah Bannon successfully defended her Doctoral Dissertation, “The Rhetoric of Second Chances: Formerly Incarcerated Activists and the Reentry Movement in the US South.” The dissertation explores the reentry movement, a social movement aimed at restoring the civil and social rights of formerly incarcerated people. The project makes theoretical contributions to the study of rhetoric and social movement and has practical utility for activists and organizers. 

 

Michael Burns received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Service at the Assistant Professor/Lecturer rank. He led a Career Readiness workshop for Lasell University in Newton, Massachusetts. Based on the success of the Career Readiness Program he founded at Texas State, he served as consultant for them to help them start a University-wide program. In addition, “Thriving Instead of Surviving: The Role of the Reasoned Action Model in Assessing the Basic Course” was accepted for publication in the Basic Communication Course Annual. The piece was co-authored with Kristen Farris, Mark Paz, and recent M.A. graduate, Sean Dyhre.

Stephanie Dailey
Stephanie Dailey

Stephanie Dailey received the Linda L. Putnam Early Career Scholar Award, given by the International Communication Association. This award honors a scholar no more than six years past receipt of the doctoral degree for a body of work that has made a significant contribution to the field of organizational communication and shows promise for continued development. 

Elizabeth Eger
Elizabeth Eger

Elizabeth K. Eger continued her service with Austin Pets Alive! this summer. She is currently helping to relaunch an emergency boarding program that supports pet guardians experiencing temporary crises so that they do not have to relinquish their pets to an animal shelter, such as hospitalization, intimate partner violence, homelessness, rehab, and more.

 

Kristen Farris received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching at the Assistant Professor rank. In addition, “Thriving Instead of Surviving: The Role of the Reasoned Action Model in Assessing the Basic Course” was accepted for publication in the Basic Communication Course Annual. The piece was co-authored with Michael Burns, Mark Paz, and recent M.A. graduate, Sean Dyhre. Kristen also co-presented with M.A. alum Laura Mallonee to the new and returning graduate instructional and teaching assistants at the Teaching and Learning Academy about "Best Practices for Teaching Online." They discussed ways to cultivate community in online classes, logistics for communicating with students, and engaged the participants in a grade norming exercise for online discussions.

Marian Houser
Marian Houser

Marian Houser was quoted in a recent article in The Guardian entitled, “I Desperately Miss Human Touch. Science May Explain Why.” For people who live alone, lockdown means 'touch starvation' as we go days without hugs, handshakes or other contact.
 

"'There are no substitutes,' said Marian Houser, a communication studies professor at Texas State University and co-found of Living Mental Wellness, 'but we have to do what we can right now to stimulate the reward center in the brain. If we don't feel rewarded, we don't release serotonin. Without serotonin, we feel unhappy, even depressed.'"
 

The article can be found here.

Maureen Keeley
Maureen Keeley

Maureen Keeley published “End of life and coping” in Qualitative Research Reports. The article was co-authored with M.A. alum Mark Generous. She published “Exploring the connection between end-of-life relational growth and personal growth after the death of a loved one” in the journal Omega, also with Mark Generous. Maureen published “An effective approach for difficult, end-of-life communication” in the journal Reflections on Nursing Leadership. She published a book chapter entitled “Families Interacting in the Health Care Context that will appear in Health Communication Theory. Maureen published a book chapter in the Handbook of Thanatology entitled “Dying process: An examination of theory, communication, culture, and ethics.” She was also interviewed for an article featured on Insider.com entitled “What are the stages of grief? How to process and deal with grief or loss.” The article can be found here.

Roseann Mandziuk presented "Online Learning Paradigms in the US: A Brief Overview" as part of the International Webinar "Introduction to Multimedia and Mass Communication Tools: From Theory to Practice," organized by Indraprastha College for Women in Delhi, India.

Josh Miller
Josh Miller

Josh Miller published “Seeding subversion and the Christian Reformed Church's study report on homosexuality” in Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies.

Manu Pokharel
Manu Pokharel

Manusheela Pokharel received the Gerald R. Miller Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award for “The Impact of Visual Message Features in Cancer Risk Communication.” The dissertation launched three studies employing multiple methodological perspectives to initiate a research program that investigated the persuasive impact of visual message features in the context of cancer prevention and control. One of the studies of the dissertation was recently published in the Journal of Behavioral Medicine. The Miller Award is presented to most outstanding dissertations completed in the field, with only three awards given per year.

Alumni Accolades

Toni Morgan
Toni Morgan

Jorlanditha Austin (M.A., 2020) recently began a PhD program at Rutgers University.

 

Phillip G. Clampitt (M.A., 1976) currently serves as Blair Endowed Chair of Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.  He just released his e-book, Clear Thinking in Age of Hype, Nonsense, and Anxiety. The book proposes a simple but dynamic tool to spark better thinking in a world filled with hype, nonsense, and anxiety.

 

Alan Grant (M.A., 2020) recently began a PhD program at Texas A&M University.

 

Kory Kelly (B.A., 2014, M.A., 2016) recently founded Legal Karma, a company that provides unique technological solutions to law firms so they can focus more energy on their clients. The company also set up the Legal Karma Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing their products free of charge to other non-profits and attorneys that focus on social justice, racial justice, and criminal justice reform.

 

Lauren Lee (M.A., 2020) recently began a PhD program at Rutgers University.


Toni Morgan (M.A., 2016) completed her PhD at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and began her new position as an Assistant Professor in the Communication and Media Studies discipline at St. Norbert College in De Pere, WI.

Michael Tahmoressi (M.A., 2020) recently began a PhD program at Rutgers University.